Unknown Australian

Originally Published: 1975

[Several Unknown Articles]

'Alice regrets...'

Alice Cooper, America's most macbre entertainer, has called off his Australian tour scheduled for November.

His "Welcome To My Nightmare" concert tour has been postponed because facilities in Australia do not allow him to make full use of his stage show, which features guillotines, monsters, and a 45.6 m (150 ft.) helium balloon.

Cooper's producer, Mr. Joe Gannon, who has staged shows for such stars as Elvis Presley and Neil Diamond, announced the decision to call off the tour after inspecting venues.

Mr. Gannon said Cooper was disappointed at the postponement, but negotiations were already in hand to bring him out early next year.

"Unfortunately it has become apparent that some of the Australian venues are not technically geared for our show," Mr. Gannon said in Sydney yesterday.

"If there is any chance that the show has to go on looking less than its best we would prefer to postpone it temporarily – which is the case now."

In March, Cooper (real name Vincent Furnier) was banned by Migration Minister Mr. Cameron as a "degenerate."

The ban was lifted last month by Mr. Cameron's successor, Senator McClelland.

A film of a Cooper concert, entitled "Good To See You Again Alice Cooper," was featured at the Festival Theatre earlier this month.

Scenes from the dramatically lit "happening" included simulated sex with a store-window dummy, the bayoneting of a baby, and Cooper's famous "duet" with a python.

(Kindly submitted from the collection of Steve McLennan.)


Alice in Thunderland

Alice Cooper is back; big-hearted, generous Alice inviting all his/her fans to share his/her nightmares.

The king of shock rock has a new album, Welcome To My Nightare, just released in Australia on a new label, Anchor Records.

Welcome To My Nightmare is also the name/concept of an Alice Cooper concert tour which began this week in the United States and will travel the world over the next eight months.

Australia will be included IF the Australian Government will allow Alice into the country.

The new album includes some radical departures from the kind of music Alice Cooper fans have grown to expect.

There's less hard rocking, more blues and even a ballad, (called Only Women Bleed. It's sick!)

Cooper fans will probably enjoy Cold Ethyl most of all; it's a wild, rocking number about a dead girl friend called Ethyl who is kept in the deep-freeze.

Another track concerns black widow spiders with a chilling introduction by one of moviedom's best known horror actors, Vincent Price.

Other tracks include Devil's Food which touches on cannibalism, Some Folks – the "folks" are sadists – and Steven, a ghostly guy who inhabits Alice's dreams.

The album ends in a lighter, more humorous vein with a track called Escape; "paint on my cruel or happy face, hide me behind it. It takes me inside another place where no one can find it."

(Kindly submitted from the collection of Steve McLennan.)


My, Alice, but how you have changed

Vincent Damon Furnier, who was born the son of a preacher, has changed a lot in the past 26 years.

Now, as the leader of the rock group, Alice Cooper, he is shocking young audiences with the sight of writhing boa constrictors and decapitated chickens in the most bizarre rock show on stage today.

The group was refused entry to Australia earlier this year because of reports of "primitive, barbaric and sick performances."

But Newcastle fans will be able to see Alice and his cohorts when they appear in the film, "Good To See You, Alice Cooper," which begins a three-day run at the Civic Theatre on Thursday.

The film consists mainly of concert footage shot during the group's "Billion Dollar Babies'" American tour last year, which promoted the record of that name.

A publicity release describes the film as "sexual, sordid, terrifying, traumatic, violent, vicious, unusual, unforgettable, blatant and brash, but above all – entertaining."

The group performs on a specially-constructed $250,000 stage with special effects such as an electric chair, a guillotine and gallows.

Alice says an audience must be completely captivated and entertained.

He says his performances are like John Wayne movies as no-one gets hurt.

Alice leaves behind his image of a weird rock fiend when not performing.

Off-stage, he says, his great loves are gold, beer and money.

The group's first big money-spinning album was "School's Out".

The record delved into the subject of dope and decadence in modern day life.

The other members of the kinky rock combination are: Dennis Dunaway, Michael Bruce, Neal Smith and Glen Buxton.

Alice says he has satirised a country fascinated by money, sex, violence, and horror.

"I'm the most American rock act," he says.

Billion Dollar Babies'" American tour last year, which promoted the record of that name.

A publicity release describes the film as "secual, sordid, terrifying, traumatic, violent, vicious, unusual, unforgettable, blatant and brash, but above all – entertaining."

The group performs on a specially-constructed $250,000 stage with special effects such as an electric chair, a guillotine and gallows.

Alice says an audience must be completely captivated and entertained.

He says his performances are like John Wayne movies as no-one gets hurt.

Alice leaves behind his image of a weird rock fiend when not performing.

Off-stage, he says, his great loves are gold, beer and money.

The group's first big money-spinning album was "School's Out".

The record delved into the subject of dope and decadence in modern day life.

The other members of the kinky rock combination are: Dennis Dunaway, Michael Bruce, Neal Smith and Glen Buxton.

Alice says he has satirised a country fascinated by money, sex, violence, and horror.

"I'm the most American rock act," he says.

(From an article or publication titled "Teen '75" in Australia. Kindly submitted from the collection of Steve McLennan.)